Friday May 13th. Vuelta a España Leg 6

For those who love to fly in multiplayer
new reply
ianfisher 101
Senior Airman
Posts: 233
Joined: 31 Jul 2019
Location: Clevedon. UK

Friday May 13th. Vuelta a España Leg 6

Post ianfisher 101 »

Note this flight will take place on Thursday May 12th 1900z.

So onto leg 6 and this week we will reach the Southern tip of mainalnd Spain. This region is home to an unfair share of beautiful towns and cities with unforgettable destinations that should be on every traveller’s bucket list, from the enchanting capital of Seville to undiscovered gems such as Estepona and Cádiz.

We start where we left of last week in Saville which is likely to be one of the most romantic and attractive cities you’ll ever experience. The Andalusian capital is made up of some of the most enchanting neighbourhoods in Spain, such as the old Jewish quarter of Santa Cruz and the former gypsy barrio of Triana. Historic monuments include the largest Gothic cathedral in the world, an elegant bullring and a Moorish palace that was featured in Game of Thrones.

Now for a treat. Perched either side of a 100m deep gorge in between two humbling natural parks, Ronda is Andalusia’s most spectacularly located town. Linking up its two halves is Puente Nuevo, a stunning bridge completed in 1793 after four decades of perilous construction. Ronda also has a strong claim to being the birthplace of the Spanish bullfight and is home to some of the best-preserved Arabic baths in Spain. Not for nothing is it the third most-visited destination in Andalusia.

Jerez de la Frontera is one of the secret wonders of southern Spain, a city that combines the stateliness of the Andalusian capital with the scruffy charms of Cádiz. It is most famous for its sherry – this is the only place on the planet where the drink can be made – and its beautiful horses, which perform in the spectacular equine ballets staged by the Royal Andalusian School of Equestrian Art. And that’s not all: many aficionados say that its gorgeous old town is the true home of flamenco.

From Jerez, it’s just half an hour’s drive to another of Andalusia’s often overlooked destinations. Packed onto a rectangular outcrop of land looking out to the Atlantic, Cádiz has a bohemian, scruffy charm all of its own. Its locals are known throughout Spain for their acerbic, witty sense of humour: to see why, visit during February, when the city holds its famous carnival. Groups of entertainers called chirigotas roam the streets, performing satirical sketches as they go

From Jerez, it’s just a few miles to another of Andalusia’s often overlooked destinations. Packed onto a rectangular outcrop of land looking out to the Atlantic, Cádiz has a bohemian, scruffy charm all of its own. Its locals are known throughout Spain for their acerbic, witty sense of humour: to see why, visit during February, when the city holds its famous carnival. Groups of entertainers called chirigotas roam the streets, performing satirical sketches as they go.

From here we acualy leave Spain for a short while and visit The sovereignty of Gibraltar which is a British Overseas Territory located at the southern tip of the Iberian Peninsula. It has an area of 2.6 sq miles and the landscape is dominated by the Rock of Gibraltar, at the foot of which is a densely populated town area, home to over 32,000 people, primarily Gibraltarians. In 1704, Anglo-Dutch forces captured Gibraltar from Spain during the War of the Spanish Succession. The territory was ceded to Great Britain in perpetuity under the Treaty of Utrecht in 1713. It became an important base for the Royal Navy, particularly during the Napoleonic Wars and World War II, as it controlled the narrow entrance and exit to the Mediterranean Sea, the Strait of Gibraltar, which is only 14.3 km wide. This choke point remains strategically important, with half the world's seaborne trade passing through it. Gibraltar's economy is based largely on tourism, online gambling, and financial services. The sovereignty of Gibraltar is a point of contention in Anglo-Spanish relations, as Spain asserts a claim to the territory. Gibraltarians overwhelmingly rejected proposals for Spanish sovereignty in a 1967 referendum, and for shared sovereignty in a 2002 referendum. Nevertheless, Gibraltar maintains close economic and cultural links with Spain, with many Gibraltarians speaking Spanish.

Now to Spains famous Costa del Sol – a fabulous stretch of coast that has seen many Spanish villages overtaken by mass tourism – Estepona has lost none of its authentically Andalusian flavour. Its multi-coloured houses, prettily adorned with bright flowers, bring Córdoba to mind; and its spacious beach, Playa de la Rada, is often less crowded than those in nearby Nerja, a much more popular tourist destination. Plaza de las Flores is the old town’s most enchanting space.

Next along the coast is Marbella, It's part of the Costa del Sol and is the headquarters of the Association of Municipalities of the region; it is also the head of the judicial district that bears its name. Marbella is situated in the foothills of the Sierra Blanca. The municipality covers an area of 117 square kilometres crossed by highways on the coast, which are its main entrances. In 2018 the population of the city was 141,463 making it the second most populous municipality in the province of Málaga and the eighth in Andalusia. It is one of the most important tourist cities of the Costa del Sol and throughout most of the year is an international tourist attraction, due mainly to its climate and tourist infrastructure. The city also has a significant archaeological heritage, several museums and performance spaces, and a cultural calendar with events ranging from reggae concerts to opera performances.

Our final stop is Málaga, the capital of the Province of Málaga. With a population of 578,460 in 2020, it is the second-most populous city in Andalusia after Seville and the sixth most populous in Spain. Málaga's history spans about 2,800 years, making it one of the oldest cities in Europe and one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the world. According to most scholars, it was founded about 770 BC by the Phoenicians. From the 6th century BC the city was under the hegemony of Ancient Carthage, and from 218 BC, it was ruled by the Roman Republic. After the fall of the empire it was under Islamic rule for 800 years, but in 1487, the Crown of Castille gained control in the midst of the Granada War. The archaeological remains and monuments from the Phoenician, Roman, Arabic and Christian eras make the historic center of the city an "open museum", displaying its history of nearly 3,000 years. The painter and sculptor Pablo Picasso, Hebrew poet and Jewish philosopher Solomon and the actor Antonio Banderas were born in Málaga. The most important business sectors in Málaga are tourism, construction and technology services, but other sectors such as transportation and logistics are beginning to expand. Málaga has consolidated as tech hub, with companies mainly concentrated in the Málaga TechPark. It hosts the headquarters of the region's largest bank, and it is the fourth-ranking city in Spain in terms of economic activity behind Madrid, Barcelona and Valencia. Regarding transportation, Málaga is served by the Málaga–Costa del Sol Airport and the Port of Málaga, whereas the city is connected to the high-speed railway network since 2007.

Aircraft Type C172
Take Off 1800 local
Weather Real
Network Joinfs
Comms A2A Discord

Airports

https://secure.simmarket.com/aerosoft-g ... p3d4.phtml
https://secure.simmarket.com/aerosoft-m ... p3d4.phtml

https://skyvector.com/?ll=36.7563802962 ... 30W%20LEMG

Image
Spitfire : P-51 : L-049 : C172 : C182 : PA-24 : PA-28 : T-6 : P-40 : V35B : J-3 : P-47 : Anson : 504K : Albatros : B377 : HE-219

new reply

Return to “Multiplayer”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest