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PostPosted: Fri Nov 12, 2010 12:12 pm 
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Airman

Joined: Wed Nov 10, 2010 2:01 am
Posts: 39
I have the P47 with Accusim: for several days all was well, 15 hours of flying no problems, now I get very intermittent start ups, the starter spins up the prop spins but does not fire, I admit this may be due to poor procedures on my part but deleting the data logs seemed to fix it for a while. If I get into flight I have suffered severe hydraulic failures, leading to low level stalls power loss and crash!!! poor piloting on my part I know but what am I doing wrong?

Finally on a nice long flight to Germany I saved my flight, (5 hours is a long part of anyone's life!) and when I re loaded it no drop tanks as if by magic where dey go.

Still, really love the P47 I probably need more training I hope someone can help :)


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PostPosted: Sat Nov 27, 2010 3:39 pm 
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Technical Sergeant

Joined: Tue Jul 29, 2008 8:20 pm
Posts: 858
Location: Hampton, VA
Hello Pip. Will start off by saying welcome to the A2A forums, and the Accu-sim family..

First off if you wish to save the aircraft in the state that you left it you must first load up another save flight (or the default flight either or will work), and then from this flight go to the file menu, and load your P-47D save flight. This will ensure your aircraft is configured just as you left it. From the drop tanks, to oil levels, oxy levels, etc...

As far as what you are doing wrong is concerned with the aircraft. Blowing up a few engines is part of the experience!! The P-47 is one of the hardest Accu-sim aircraft for me to master. As I have blown up numerous engines, and crashed it a number of times as well. If you press Shift+7 you will bring up your engine status page, and that will tell you how many hours are on your airframe, engine, and you will be able to rebuild your engine from this menu as well good as new! It will also tell you if your engine is in excellent, good, fair, or poor condition. Shift+2 is also a good key command to tell you if anything was found on the airplanes inspection, and give you an idea of its current state as well.. So you no longer need t delete the Accu-sim log files as that also deletes your airframe hours. However if you have a hydraulics failure you will need to reload the P-47 from the aircraft menu in FSX. Which returns it to working condition.

For flight you really need to watch your manifold pressure as the supercharger at sea level can easily overboost the engine. The max is 52" on the gauge, but the supercharger will easily put you at 60". So you need to be mindful of that. Also in flight you need to monitor your engines RPM along with the manifold pressure. If you are running 2300RPM for instance, but 42" of manfold pressure (the recommended RPM is 2500 for this) you will be destroying the engine by overpowering it at that RPM. It was one of the hardest concepts for me to grasp, and one that I did not learn until the B-17G Accu-sim came out. Another thing you need to wait on is for the oil temperature to reach at least 50 (indicating the engine is properly warmed up) before applying any kind of power. As this also destroys the engine. Right now I am only 6 hours into a new engine myself. So not sure yet if I will make it the full 100 cycle. We will see, but this tips help me get about 40 hours on my last engine. It was killed when I nosed over onto a runway that was to short (I applied heavy braking deciding it was better to eat the engine than crash the plane).. If not for that mistake I think I would still be flying that engine. So good luck!

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S. Jordan
AM; United States Navy
FSX Hours: 3000 and counting! All A2A birds in the hangar except the 172 and Bonanza.


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 28, 2010 2:40 am 
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Airman

Joined: Wed Nov 10, 2010 2:01 am
Posts: 39
Thankyou very much for your post,I will try your shift 2 tips and the save/loading set up, As I have got better with the P47
there have been fewer crashes and fewer resets needed. I went back to fly some "ordinary" FSX planes for a bit, they are so dull by comparison!!

I have burst the Turbo a couple of times, mostly on the Take off/landing when the engines are nearly flat out or shut off, it adds a bit of an edge to a landing..... and yes I've also nosed over, in the wet, on a typically grey wet East Anglian Morning. :)

Regards Pip (not so many hours as you on FSX)


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 28, 2010 8:53 am 
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Technical Sergeant

Joined: Tue Jul 29, 2008 8:20 pm
Posts: 858
Location: Hampton, VA
Can help you with the bursting turbo as well. Your turbo boost lever should be brought all the way back to off before even touching the throttle. Your throttle should also be all the way forward before you start messing with the turbo as well. This will prevent you from popping the turbo. I only have done it once (did it on purpose when I first got it after Scott showed it in one of the videos). I like breaking my Accu-sim birds when I first get them. Is how I learn what not to do. :lol: Hopefully you can have many hours of happy flying.

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S. Jordan
AM; United States Navy
FSX Hours: 3000 and counting! All A2A birds in the hangar except the 172 and Bonanza.


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 28, 2010 1:38 pm 
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Senior Master Sergeant
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Joined: Sat Nov 11, 2006 4:15 pm
Posts: 1829
Location: Great Falls Army Air Base, Montana
I believe that historically the turbo was sometimes used to assist on takeoff when Thunderbolts were slung to the max with bombs, ammunition and extra fuel and had a limited runway to work with. For FSX flying you shouldn't need the turbo until somewhere above 10,000 feet when the air starts to get to thin to maintain your desired manifold pressure through throttle and prop pitch adjustments alone.

Vintage training manuals warn to always keep the boost lever behind the throttle lever. When decreasing your manifold pressure, pull the boost lever back first then go for the throttle. There are other reasons for this than turbo overspeeding, namely turbo back-pressure collapse, but it is good advice to keep in mind. I'd suggest that your turbo should be all the way back anyhow long before you begin your landing.

Just keep watching that turbo RPM guage and light and don't let the turbo overspeed. This means increasing the turbo as needed, not slamming it to 100% just because you think it is time to boost; it also means decreasing the boost as you descend into thicker air.

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PostPosted: Mon Nov 29, 2010 1:46 am 
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Airman

Joined: Wed Nov 10, 2010 2:01 am
Posts: 39
Hi Guys, thank you for your tips, I generally only run the turbo a touch on take off,and I will stop doing it now!!!!
on landing its usually shut.Its the, dragged approach "Panic" emergency power thing!!! that pops it..... The same thing that caused a Blenheim to crash at Duxford Airshow..... they hadn't got/read the manual properly either! (ps I don't think the Blenheim has a blower and I don't have the full details so if you were the pilot of the Blenheim please don't get offended by my suggestion...!!")

Pip "POP" Bond


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