Humiliating!

The most maneuverable WWII aircraft in history
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stapme!
Senior Airman
Posts: 187
Joined: 13 Sep 2005

Humiliating!

Post stapme! »

I am not exactly a novice simmer when it comes to WWII airplanes, but I am not a real pilot and there is always something to learn. For some reason I can't come to grips with getting the 190 radials off the ground. The Tank inlines want to go straight and bore a hole in the air and I have had much less trouble with them. I am locking my tailwheel, I have a foot firmly down on the right pedal. I am looking out along the left side of the nose, I am watching my throttle work, but I still can't keep the beast in a straight line. What should I be doing which I am not!

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Snuffy
Senior Master Sergeant
Posts: 2101
Joined: 18 May 2004
Location: The Good ol U.S. of A.

Post Snuffy »

Fly American! :roll:

Sorry sounds like yer doin everything right ... double check yer calibration?
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Snuffy
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redrooster
Technical Sergeant
Posts: 527
Joined: 15 Aug 2004

Post redrooster »

How quickly are you advancing the throttles? With the 190, you have to do it slowly and carefuly, adjusting your rudder as needed.
The propeller is just a big fan in front of the plane used to keep the pilot cool. When it stops, you can actually watch the pilot start sweating.

Point-man
Staff Sergeant
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Location: Ft. Worth
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Post Point-man »

Redrooster has it right. You have to slowly work the throttles up to 100%. Say open the throttle up to about 30% and let it get some speed built up then put it up to about 45 - 50%. Once the tail comes off the ground you should be fine to push the throttle up to 100% gradually.
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SD_Research
A2A Major
Posts: 461
Joined: 18 Jan 2005

Post SD_Research »

Point-man wrote:Redrooster has it right. You have to slowly work the throttles up to 100%. Say open the throttle up to about 30% and let it get some speed built up then put it up to about 45 - 50%. Once the tail comes off the ground you should be fine to push the throttle up to 100% gradually.
Takeoffs are not done at 100 percent throttle, check the checklist to see what the boost pressure should be for a normal takeoff, and advance the throttle smoothly. For the Fw190 A8, this is going to be 1.42 ata and if you have plenty of runway you could easily take off with only 1.1 or 1.2 ata. However, you don't have to take forever to get it up to takeoff power, because the sooner you get there, the sooner the propwash will give you some rudder control. No doubt, these Fw190s needed more attention than most fighters of this type.

stapme!
Senior Airman
Posts: 187
Joined: 13 Sep 2005

Post stapme! »

Thank you all for the excellent information. I will apply the tips with care. I can't say how much I enjoy learning the ropes with these marvelous WOP models. I've been flying the He 219 for months.

stapme!
Senior Airman
Posts: 187
Joined: 13 Sep 2005

Post stapme! »

Thanks to all for the advice. I am getting airborne but my style would result in my being sent to a Luftwaffe Field Division. Practice makes perfect!

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