Basic TIPS

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wothan
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Re: Basic TIPS

Post wothan »

Read here why a 3 point landing is much safer than landing mainwheels first and keeping the tail up...

http://www.google.dk/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=& ... 8183,d.bGs


FinnJ
When I like to do basic flying, I turn to A2A Aircraft, cause A2A "basic" flying means "complex" procedures.

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afcraig2010
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Re: Basic TIPS

Post afcraig2010 »

G-BJPS wrote:Great thread for tips Scott, thanks.

I have a couple of questions: The Generator; why does it have to stay on all the time?

And Carb Heat; do radial engines require the same amount of Carb Heat usage and technique as in say, the Comanche and Cherokee?

I noticed some reduction in MP and RPM whilst taxiing this afternoon, in rain showers with live ASN. Carb Heat recovered the reductions, but i was unsure as the winds were high, and sometimes this has an effect in FSX.

Cheers,

John.
I'd like to know the answer to the first question as well. Maybe it's just a bug? Every time I shut down the T-6 (fully, and turning off the generator) the generator switch will always be on when I load up the T-6 again.

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AKar
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Re: Basic TIPS

Post AKar »

I don't think there is any reason to switch off the generator normally. Not sure why it has the safety cover, likely just so that no one unnecessarily turns it off. :mrgreen: In many airplanes there is no generator switch at all, but this one has such as a backup measure.

-Esa
Let me imagine what is impossible - and then do it.

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Piper_EEWL
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Re: Basic TIPS

Post Piper_EEWL »

That's interesting. I never really thought about it. Most planes I fly do have a separate generator switch like the A2A Cessna 172 and 182. But there are some that don't like the A2A Pipers. I guess it's once more down to preference of the manufacturer of is there any technical reasons? Differences in the left rival system?
B377&COTS, J3 Cub, B-17G, Spitfire, P-40, P-51D, C172, C182, Pa28, Pa24, T-6 Texan, L-049&COTS, Bonanza V35B

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AKar
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Re: Basic TIPS

Post AKar »

Alternators typically have contactors because they can't be made behind reverse current sensing device. Therefore there must be means to switch them off line as they would draw current through their field windings all the time when battery is on, unless ACU has an appropriate function to prevent this. These kinds of commutated DC generators, on the other hand, have their field windings shunt with the generator armature, and normally do not require current for initial energization. Therefore the whole package can be behind a reverse current sensing relay or diode.

-Esa
Let me imagine what is impossible - and then do it.

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afcraig2010
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Re: Basic TIPS

Post afcraig2010 »

Didn't know that. Good to know.

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Piper_EEWL
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Re: Basic TIPS

Post Piper_EEWL »

Thanks for the explanation Esa!
B377&COTS, J3 Cub, B-17G, Spitfire, P-40, P-51D, C172, C182, Pa28, Pa24, T-6 Texan, L-049&COTS, Bonanza V35B

eker
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Re: Basic TIPS

Post eker »

Rudder trim on TO.

Text box reads in %.

Of much is 2 units in %? Should it - or +?

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AKar
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Re: Basic TIPS

Post AKar »

eker wrote:Rudder trim on TO.

Text box reads in %.

Of much is 2 units in %? Should it - or +?
I think it was 2 o'clock, as in trim wheel position? 12 o'clock being neutral.

-Esa
Let me imagine what is impossible - and then do it.

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Nick - A2A
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Re: Basic TIPS

Post Nick - A2A »

Yeah, two o'clock for rudder ("optional") and eleven o'clock for elevator. Be sure not to get them mixed up or you'll end up with a fair bit of nose down trim dialled-in. Before yesterday's update, that would potentially have been rather calamitous! :shock:

That rudder trim wheel looks pretty hard to get to (in the real cockpit I mean), especially if one has 'fat hands'. :)

Nick
A2A Simulations Inc.

eker
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Re: Basic TIPS

Post eker »

Thanks!

I have switches on my stick for pitch trim.
No change for mix up
:)

joe bob
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Re: Basic TIPS

Post joe bob »

AKar wrote:I don't think there is any reason to switch off the generator normally. Not sure why it has the safety cover, likely just so that no one unnecessarily turns it off. :mrgreen: In many airplanes there is no generator switch at all, but this one has such as a backup measure.

-Esa
I was reading an account of a P-47 pilot in Italy I believe it was, who started losing all his electrical equipment, he was moving to signal an abort when he noticed the Generator switch was off.
He was mystified why any one would turn it off and after that day it was the units policy to safety wire them in the on position.
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AKar
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Re: Basic TIPS

Post AKar »

joe bob wrote:
AKar wrote:I don't think there is any reason to switch off the generator normally. Not sure why it has the safety cover, likely just so that no one unnecessarily turns it off. :mrgreen: In many airplanes there is no generator switch at all, but this one has such as a backup measure.

-Esa
I was reading an account of a P-47 pilot in Italy I believe it was, who started losing all his electrical equipment, he was moving to signal an abort when he noticed the Generator switch was off.
He was mystified why any one would turn it off and after that day it was the units policy to safety wire them in the on position.
An interesting story! As there is little reason for the cover in technical sense, I was mostly kidding about it, but your account suggests there is some... service-based experience behind it! :) I remember a pilot guy who put some Post-Its on the displays, reading basically "DON'T!" because someone had a... "fetish" as that pilot named it when asked for a reason for the notes, to turn the displays "off" from their brightness pots after the daily checks. If the pot wasn't needed so often, it would have had a safety cover too in no time!

. . .

Re. the previous discussion about alternators having "master" switches...it is a good little thing to know because it gives a reason for the checklist item in an alternator failure (or equivalent) list to turn it off after the attempts to resurrect it have failed. Otherwise, having the alternator switch on could consume the precious battery charge as the ACU would, if it and the energizing circuit are functional, keep the field current up to the limit to energize it, in a futile attempt to bring up the volts. Of course, most manuals don't bother to give the reasoning for it, making it just another line among thousands. In generators, that's not a problem, because the whole pack can be isolated by a reverse current sensing device.

-Esa
Let me imagine what is impossible - and then do it.

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LeandroPinheiro
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Re: Basic TIPS

Post LeandroPinheiro »

Hello Scott,

It is possible in a future update, placing the antenna in front of the cockpit? Optional in shift+7?

Image

Thanks

Leandro
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Tailspin45
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Set you axis curves!

Post Tailspin45 »

The most basic of tips, but would hate to have someone new to the T6, and the marvelously realistic A2A rendition of the bird, get the wrong impression: you must set the pitch, roll, and yaw curves for your joystick to get the proper feel (which is true for all the other wonderful A2A aircraft...any FSX/P3D aircraft, for that matter.)

"Right out of the box" my newly downloaded Texan felt twitchier than a Pitts. It was almost unflyable. This ol' girl weights two and half tons, and is certainly responsive, but she's sure not nimble. Rolls are stately, loops are...well, imagine you're driving a sedan not a sports car.

Don't get me wrong, the SNJ may be my favorite aircraft (although I can't think of any I'd kick out of bed). Thousands of sweaty hands have yanked and banked and loved her. But to get the right sensation you need to tweak your settings. When you do, she'll be one of your favorites too.

Even a Lazy-8 is fun. Constant pitch change, constant roll change. Sensuous even. Nose starts up, left wing starts down. Maximum pitch up at the 45, maximum bank at to 90 with the nose on the horizon. Maximum pitch down at the 135 (catch it or you'll overshoot and end up low), rolling out to wings level and same altitude you started at the 180. Repeat turing right. Control forces constantly changing, very different turning left and right thanks to torque, gyroscopic effects and p-factor.

Takes practices, but you can do it. And while you are think of all those before you that practiced just like you are before they climbed into a P-40, a P-51, or a Jug. Or a Wildcat, a Hellcat, a Bearcat.

Precision is the thing, and the A2A Texan is certainly that.
Last edited by Tailspin45 on 02 Apr 2016, 11:28, edited 4 times in total.
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