Heidi takes her "Six" out for a spin

The world's most popular advanced trainer of WWII
User avatar
Piper_EEWL
Chief Master Sergeant
Posts: 4232
Joined: 26 Nov 2014
Location: Germany

Re: Heidi takes her "Six" out for a spin

Post Piper_EEWL »

Bruce Hamilton wrote:No interactive walkaround? :shock:
Where did you get that from? Or am I missing something?!
B377&COTS, J3 Cub, B-17G, Spitfire, P-40, P-51D, C172, C182, Pa28, Pa24, T-6 Texan, L-049&COTS, Bonanza V35B

Bomber_12th
Technical Sergeant
Posts: 706
Joined: 28 Sep 2004
Location: Minnesota

Re: Heidi takes her "Six" out for a spin

Post Bomber_12th »

The A2A P-40, P-47, and B-17 already have inertia starters, if you're familiar with those aircraft - first you must spin up the flywheel, and once the flywheel is fully energized, you engage the starter and the energy from the flywheel is transferred to the crankshaft which gets it rotating. Inertia starters were controlled either via a three-position toggle switch or a three-position foot pedal on the floor (for instance, various marks of P-40 had either the three-position switch or the three-position foot pedal). Aircraft like the Mustang just have a spring-loaded toggle switch to hold in-order to directly turn the crankshaft. Depending on the make/model of T-6 you're in, and/or whatever modifications it has or hasn't had over the years, you'll find either type of starter installed (electric starters being a feature common to late and post-war variants, like the AT-6G).
John Terrell

User avatar
Aymi
Staff Sergeant
Posts: 333
Joined: 23 Jul 2011
Location: France - LFBD

Re: Heidi takes her "Six" out for a spin

Post Aymi »

Bruce Hamilton wrote:No interactive walkaround? :shock:
Not a big deal. The most interesting stuff happens in flight imo 8)
Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul

User avatar
Alan_A
Senior Master Sergeant
Posts: 1605
Joined: 05 Aug 2009
Location: Bethesda, MD

Re: Heidi takes her "Six" out for a spin

Post Alan_A »

How do we know it doesn't have an interactive walkaround? Just because we haven't seen a picture of it doesn't mean it doesn't exist.
"Ah, Paula, they are firing at me!" -- Saint-Exupery

User avatar
Piper_EEWL
Chief Master Sergeant
Posts: 4232
Joined: 26 Nov 2014
Location: Germany

Re: Heidi takes her "Six" out for a spin

Post Piper_EEWL »

Alan_A wrote:How do we know it doesn't have an interactive walkaround? Just because we haven't seen a picture of it doesn't mean it doesn't exist.
That's what I thought. Bruce's statement sounded like he knows something!?
B377&COTS, J3 Cub, B-17G, Spitfire, P-40, P-51D, C172, C182, Pa28, Pa24, T-6 Texan, L-049&COTS, Bonanza V35B

User avatar
Scott - A2A
A2A General
Posts: 15739
Joined: 11 Feb 2004
Location: USA
Contact:

Re: Heidi takes her "Six" out for a spin

Post Scott - A2A »

We designed the walk around for our GA line. Our Warbirds instead rely on the CONTROLS panel to do things like removing the chocks, fill the oil, etc. Unique to the T-6 is hand propping, tie downs, towing, and a smoke tank. There is also a hangar option that simulates the airplane being stored in a 45 deg F hangar when not in use. As well as two fully functional cockpits.

Another cool feature added is a new physics vibration system that taps into the large radial engine (can see some of this in the video).

Regarding the starters, we model the starters in use today. The direct drive starter is like our Mustang and GA aircraft, while the inertia starter is unique in that it is modified that the starter directly cranks the wheel, that cranks the engine. You can see (and hear) in the video how the wheel and the engine both ramp up together, sort of pulling and pushing each other. If you release the starter, and let the engine wind down, you can hear and feel this interaction until the engine stops. So rather than a press, wait, then engage (like the P-40), it's a press and hold while both the wheel and engine wind up and down together. It's a very cool system, as just cranking the engine without even starting it is interesting.

Scott.
A2A Simulations Inc.

User avatar
Aymi
Staff Sergeant
Posts: 333
Joined: 23 Jul 2011
Location: France - LFBD

Re: Heidi takes her "Six" out for a spin

Post Aymi »

Thanks for the clarification Scott. I can't wait :D
Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul

User avatar
Scott - A2A
A2A General
Posts: 15739
Joined: 11 Feb 2004
Location: USA
Contact:

Re: Heidi takes her "Six" out for a spin

Post Scott - A2A »

I posted a little cockpit tour set of screens on the first post of this thread.

And btw, I was clearly not paying attention while taking these shots as you can see the engine is over boosted. Just like the real engine, it is unlikely blow up if you over boost it, it will just wear down faster. Someone asked if you could over boost the engine, so I just left this in.

But, in reality if I were to own and operate a six with this beautiful (and expensive) Pratt & Whitney r1340, I would limit my boost to 32" just like we did in our training. You never need 36" unless you are doing a serious short field takeoff.

Scott.
A2A Simulations Inc.

User avatar
Medtner
Master Sergeant
Posts: 1246
Joined: 30 Sep 2013
Location: Arendal, Norway
Contact:

Re: Heidi takes her "Six" out for a spin

Post Medtner »

Scott - A2A wrote:I posted a little cockpit tour set of screens on the first post of this thread.

And btw, I was clearly not paying attention while taking these shots as you can see the engine is over boosted. Just like the real engine, it won't blow up if you over boost it, it will just wear down faster.

Scott.
I was just about to comment on this - the engine MP is redlined at 3000 feet, but coming down several hundred feet makes it overboost. This is the same thing one has to be careful with in the P-40 - it isn't made for high boost, but can and will if one is careless (or really need the ekstra boost).

EDIT: And what's with the oil temp? :-P
Erik Haugan Aasland,

Arendal, Norway
(Homebase: Kristiansand Lufthavn, Kjevik (ENCN)

All the Accusim-planes are in my hangar, but they aren't sitting long enough for their engines to cool much before next flight!

User avatar
Piper_EEWL
Chief Master Sergeant
Posts: 4232
Joined: 26 Nov 2014
Location: Germany

Re: Heidi takes her "Six" out for a spin

Post Piper_EEWL »

Scott - A2A wrote:We designed the walk around for our GA line. Our Warbirds instead rely on the CONTROLS panel to do things like removing the chocks, fill the oil, etc. Unique to the T-6 is hand propping, tie downs, towing, and a smoke tank. There is also a hangar option that simulates the airplane being stored in a 45 deg F hangar when not in use. As well as two fully functional cockpits.

Another cool feature added is a new physics vibration system that taps into the large radial engine (can see some of this in the video).
OK. Thanks for clarifying that Scott. To bad that the Six won't have a walkaround. I really like that feature. But I'm really looking forward to the release of the T-6 regardless.
B377&COTS, J3 Cub, B-17G, Spitfire, P-40, P-51D, C172, C182, Pa28, Pa24, T-6 Texan, L-049&COTS, Bonanza V35B

User avatar
crazac
Technical Sergeant
Posts: 507
Joined: 02 Sep 2014

Re: Heidi takes her "Six" out for a spin

Post crazac »

Well, it is officially time for me to knock out my list, clear the schedule and find that bank. Here piggy piggy... :twisted: [HAMMER]

User avatar
AKar
A2A Mechanic
Posts: 4419
Joined: 26 May 2013

Re: Heidi takes her "Six" out for a spin

Post AKar »

Scott - A2A wrote:But, in reality if I were to own and operate a six with this beautiful (and expensive) Pratt & Whitney r1340, I would limit my boost to 32" just like we did in our training. You never need 36" unless you are doing a serious short field takeoff.
This likely makes an interesting study topic! :) To my current knowledge, I would not advice that practice, for similar reasons which are stated in the very good T-6G USAF flight manual:
[...] to be remembered in operating engines at high power is that full Take-off Power is to be preferred over take-off rpm with reduced manifold pressure. This procedure results in less engine wear for two reasons. First, the higher resulting brake horsepower decreases the time required to obtain the objective of such high-power operation. At take-off, for example, the use of full power decreases the time required to reach an altitude and airspeed where it is safe to reduce power and shortens the time required to reach the airspeed that will provide more favorable cylinder cooling. Second, high rpm results in high loads on the reciprocating parts because of inertia forces. As these loads are partially offset by the gas pressure in the cylinder, the higher cylinder pressures resulting from use of full take-off manifold pressure will give lower net loads and less wear. Sustained high rpm is a major cause of engine wear. It requires more "rpm minutes” and "piston-ring miles” to take off with reduced manifold pressure. In addition to the engine wear factor, a take-off at reduced power is comparable to starting with approximately one-third of the runway behind the airplane. Therefore full power should always be used on all take-offs.
I wonder, as the R-1340 is quite low-tuned engine compared to even several today's GA piston engines, actually rather similar to Comanche's, what would make that particular (and generally rather correct) advice in the manual to not be followed? If there exists any significant service experience on the downsides of going to full power, it would be interesting to know what are they. :) Of course, there are certain design differences to the common GA pistons (such as RPM-dependent supercharging), but those seem to even work against such a practice.

Interesting aspects!

-Esa
Let me imagine what is impossible - and then do it.

User avatar
Scott - A2A
A2A General
Posts: 15739
Joined: 11 Feb 2004
Location: USA
Contact:

Re: Heidi takes her "Six" out for a spin

Post Scott - A2A »

Esa,

I don't buy it especially when you consider you are flying the plane many days, at 30" for extended times. Running the engine for another 60 seconds during takeoff at 32" is in no way going to hurt the engine. Shock cooling also goes both ways.

You do a takeoff run, and as soon as the gear is tucked up, the power comes back to 30" or less.

Taking off with 32" gets you to your climb power setting just a few seconds later.

This is the way Vlado Lenoch flies their T-6 and the way their mechanic and owner want us to fly it. And I agree with their methods.

But, you and others can certainly use 36" if you would like.

Scott.
A2A Simulations Inc.

User avatar
AKar
A2A Mechanic
Posts: 4419
Joined: 26 May 2013

Re: Heidi takes her "Six" out for a spin

Post AKar »

Scott - A2A wrote:I don't buy it especially when you consider you are flying the plane many days, at 30" for extended times.
But importantly, at reduced RPM.

Anyways, as mentioned, an interesting aspect on which the opinions vary. I am a believer of the flank power when going up or accelerating, in every modestly boosted piston engine, but the radials are a new world to me. :) Of course, every operator sets their methods as appropriate to their operations, knowledge and service experience.

-Esa
Let me imagine what is impossible - and then do it.

Photobird
Airman Basic
Posts: 1
Joined: 10 Nov 2015

Re: Heidi takes her "Six" out for a spin

Post Photobird »

The options for canopy framing, prop spinner, and ADF football are a nice feature. I'm definitely in for this plane but I have to ask: Any chance of an option (maybe after initial release) for a Navy SNJ-4C/5C with tailhook and cable guard on the tailwheel?

new reply

Return to “T-6 "Texan"”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests